Why are rich out convincing poor people to go to work in America?


A case can be made that the overall economy is also very important and destruction of it will also be damaging to workers’ health. But that’s not what is motivating these return to work calls.

The rich are worried that a precedent is being established that the government will pay people to not work, that we can be bailed out, just like they are when something goes wrong.

And when workers won’t work, rich people start losing money.

The rich have seen their investments value decline and will continue to do so. As such they are worried and lobbying to protect their wealth. Corporate bail outs are quick and long term. Consequences are for the next CEO (to get bailed out), investing in people takes time. Failure removes their bonuses and incentives.

The whole US corporate governance structure actively incentiveses this behaviour.

They may even think they are “entitled” to the fruits of our labor, and they are being treated unfairly. In their view, if a few thousand, or perhaps tens of thousands die while maintaining the status quo, well that’s good for the country, because it’s good for them.

The first ever exchange program between a school in Tanzania and a school in the United States.


Glad to have initiated the first ever student exchange program between a school in Tanzania and a school in the United States. Today, December 4th, 2019–students and their teachers from White Lake High School will start a two week journey of intensive academic and cultural exchange program at Centennial High School in Atlanta, Georgia.

Students will spend time in an America high school, visits the Georgia Aquarium, the Civil Rights Museums, Coca Cola, and the CNN canter. In addition, the Tanzanian students will have the opportunity to meet and learn more about international diplomacy from ambassador Andrew Young. Furthermore, the students will guests at the Historical Ebenezer Church–the church where Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, was a co-pastor.

This is truly historical.

Tanzania and United States Student academic and Cultural Exchange Program.


The first group of high schoolers from Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania 🇹🇿 are on the flight right now for their international academic and cultural exchange program in Atlanta, USA.

If you believe your school in Tanzania🇹🇿, Kenya, Uganda, and Botswana will benefit from this international exposure—reach out to Kibogoji Experiential Learning Inc (678-446-0320) or edtreks(770-356-5874) for more information.

Building Student Leadership Through International Experiences.

Mvomero District Education Officials Visiting Kibogoji Experiential Learning Inc


Today KELI made another milestone in improving access and quality education in rural Tanzania. Our main goal as an organization is bridge the technological and academic outcome gap that exists between rural and urban schools in Tanzania.

See the pictures from the visit below:

KELI’s Online and Offline EdServices


#1: KELI Online and Offline Services

#Do you know your child’s level in Math, Science, and English or any other subject?

Shouldn’t she or he be on tract?

Unfortunately many of our beautiful children are not on track academically.

That’s where KELI comes in. Our customized and individualized online and offline services can fill any academic gaps your child is experiencing.

Our focus is on the pre-primary and primary school education. We believe a stronger academic foundation is the key for success in schools and life.

Here is our plan:

1. We will give your child a diagnostic test so she or he knows exactly where s/he stands.

If s/he is deficient in any of the core subjects, we will provide him or her with the appropriate resources and help to close the gap through a customized and individualized intervention education program.

2. Enroll your child in our online or offline K-7 enrichment education program – self driven ( all subjects K- 7).

In addition, We Advocate for your special need child as well for better learning environment and outcome.

#Will help your child close the gap in any subject.

3. At a small fee, Will will prepare your child to take competency tests such as SATs and ACTs required for most Colleges in the United States.

Our Work is to Prepare your child Close their academic Gaps in any Subject.

Ask Us How by emailing to sfundi1@gmail.com

Kibogoji Experiential Learning, Inc (KELI) Update 2018


There is a Swahili saying that says, “Ndo Ndo Ndo, Si Chururu.” The saying can be translated into English as, “Drip Drip, Fills the Bucket.” That is exactly what has happened at KELI. KELI started two years ago with 25 students in the backroom of my mom’s house. It was a simple gesture to help kids in my community get a library stocked with reading and technological resources aimed at bridging instructional and technological gap that exists between rural and urban schools in Tanzania.

 

 

 

It was a small project.

I had no idea how important it would be?

Or, how useful it would become?

Since KELI’s opening in January of 2016, the project has reached over 1000 kids in its after-school academic enrichment programs, in the tutorial help for math, English and computer skills development program, and through its experiential learning field trips to various businesses and government organization in the area.

The experiences have been truly wonderful and positive for the children.

 

 

Because of the successes we have had. The demand for the program has increased exponentially. The center became too small to accommodate all the children interested in our programming. Thus, I made a decision to grow, increase space and capacity to accommodate a greater number of children in the community.

In November of 2017, KELI’s expansion started.

 

At the moment, thanks to our generous supporters such as yourself, we have been able to complete two classrooms, a toilet, and a teachers’ office. By understanding the role play, plays in learning, KELI wishes to construct a state of the art playground at the center. We hope you will partner with us to make this dream of ours a reality. We currently need $1500 to have the playground constructed and installed. We hope you will support our vision by donating to this cause.

So far, we have raised $350 on Facebook and $55 on GoFundMe page.

Below are some pictures showing the progress we have made constructing the main building (two classrooms and teachers office) and toilets. We hope you will be so kind to help us reach the $1500 goal for a playground.

 

 

 

 

To support this project, please click here

Analyzing Mv. Spice Islander’s Investigation Report in Light of the Mv. Nyerere Ferry Sinking in Mwanza Region of Tanzania.


According to the report, “MV Spice Islander” had a maximum human loading capacity of 600 passengers. However, at the time of its sinking, it was carrying 2470 passengers. That is four times the maximum allowed. Further reports says, 941 passengers survived, 203 passengers lost their lives and 1326 passengers are still missing. I’m saddened by the magnitude of human loss.

The report further states, the cause of the accident was “severe levels of negligence.” Nine (9) people have been arraigned in connection to the accident. The dead and survivors of this accident will be compensated at a rate of Tshs 125,000 for 80 months which is equivalent to Tshs 10,000,000 per person.

The suggested figure is what I have issues with.  I feel like the figures are too low and will not work as a deterrent for future man-made accidents. My understanding is that human life is priceless. To save it, stiffer penalties must be imposed as a deterrent.

My questions are:

  1. Why payments are based on the basic salary levels?
  2. What made the commission to assume that all these people were going to die in the next 6 years and a half (80 months)?
  3. Why not use established income earning potentials for each of the passengers and life expectancy figures to figure out the payment?

This was an opportunity to severely punish those involved so that it will be a lesson to them and for others currently benefiting from this kind of behavior. Don’t let this incident be another missed opportunity like MV Bukoba. This should be a wake up call to shipowners, bus owners, and everyone involved in the transportation business. They needs to understand that “if you cause an accident due to negligence” leading to a loss or loss of lives; severe consequences will follow. The “kazi ya mungu” excuse should not be be the norm.

Once a person purchase a ticket, it’s a contractual agreement between the two parties and that the latter will transport the former safely from point A to point B. These contracts need to be honored. Maybe in the future (“that means now”) the government could implement a system that forces bus, ship and any kind of transportation business owners to declare the insurance value of a passenger and luggage on the back of the ticket in case an accident happens.

My belief is that if the owners are subjected to stiff penalties whenever accidents happens and are starting to see that their profits are being eroded; they will make sure that accidents due to negligence will not be a daily occurrences in Tanzania. To make them change their minds and put safety measures before profit, you have to hit them where it matters most—profits.

In addition to a deterrence on the part of the ship, buses, and any-other type of transportation owners. Citizen awareness campaign regarding overcrowding in public transportation needs to be carried out. It seems people are not learning from these incidence. More campaigns on road safety and problems associated with overcrowding are severely needed.

I will end you with this, “the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over while expecting a different outcome.”

The Killing shall continue……..

Volunteering Opportunity at Kibogoji Experiential Learning, Inc (K.E.L.I.)


VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITY IN RURAL TANZANIA

EDUCATION AND OUTREACH PROGRAM AT KIBOGOJI EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, INC (KELI) IN TURIANI, MOROGORO -TANZANIA (JANUARY 2019)

Who Are We?

Kibogoji Experiential Learning, Inc (KELI) is registered Not For Profit Organization in Tanzania. Its mission is to bridge technological and instructional quality gap between urban and rural students of all levels in Tanzania.

Location:

Turiani, Mvomero District, Morogoro Region

Duration:

1 – 12 months

Volunteer project:

The project is organized in support of our pre-school and after school education enrichment programs. Kibogoji Experiential Learning, Inc (KELI) promotes early childhood education and Universal Primary Education. The increase in enrollment has increased the load to our staff and other workers to deliver quality services to the children. We currently serve a population of more than 100 children with only three teachers.

Volunteers are needed for teaching, training teachers, and in our outreach programs. We hope our volunteer will also help in fundraising and grant writing to secure more funding. Therefore, if you have passion for children, have worked in fundraising and are a successful grant writer, we welcome you at KELI.

Project theme:

Improving school learning environment and quality education.

Language:

English and Kiswahili.

Duration of the project:

1 to 12 months. The program is running throughout the year with vacation breaks in June and December.

Accommodation:

Kibogoji Experiential Learning, Inc (KELI) will provide accommodation for the duration of your stay. You will be given separate living quarter with own private entry. There is shared fridge, microwave, flat tv, and a range oven (GAS AND ELECTRIC COMBO).

Location:

Turiani, Mvomero District, in Morogoro Region.

Age range:

5 – 19 years old.

Participation fee:

$750

Extra fee:

$450 for 1 month; $650 for 2-3 months; $950 for 3-6 months; $1200 for 6-9 months; $1500 for 9-12 months

The extra fee is intended to support the local host. It is due upon arrival.

Contact Us: sfundi1@yahoo.com

Should children be the most important thing in your family?


Author: John Rosemond.

I was having difficulties reading it from the photo so I re-posted it as a comment. It’s worth the read.

I recently asked a married couple who have three kids, none of whom are yet teens, “Who are the most important people in your family?”

Like all good moms and dads of this brave new millennium, they answered, “Our kids!”

“Why?” I then asked. “What is it about your kids that gives them that status?” And like all good moms and dads of this brave new millennium, they couldn’t answer the question other than to fumble with appeals to emotion.

So, I answered the question for them: “There is no reasonable thing that gives your children that status.”

I went on to point out that many if not most of the problems they’re having with their kids — typical stuff, these days — are the result of treating their children as if they, their marriage, and their family exist because of the kids when it is, in fact, the other way around. Their kids exist because of them and their marriage and thrive because they have created a stable family.

Furthermore, without them, their kids wouldn’t eat well, have the nice clothing they wear, live in the nice home in which they live, enjoy the great vacations they enjoy, and so on. Instead of lives that are relatively carefree (despite the drama to the contrary that they occasionally manufacture), their children would be living lives full of worry and want.

This issue is really the heart of the matter. People my age know it’s the heart of the matter because when we were kids it was clear to us that our parents were the most important people in our families. And that, right there, is why we respected our parents and that, right there, is why we looked up to adults in general. Yes, Virginia, once upon a time in the United States of America, children were second-class citizens, to their advantage.

It was also clear to us — I speak, of course, in general terms, albeit accurate — that our parents’ marriages were more important to them than their relationships with us. Therefore, we did not sleep in their beds or interrupt their conversations. The family meal, at home, was regarded as more important than after-school activities. Mom and Dad talked more — a lot more — with one another than they talked with you. For lack of pedestals, we emancipated earlier and much more successfully than have children since.

The most important person in an army is the general. The most important person in a corporation is the CEO. The most important person in a classroom is the teacher. And the most important person in a family are the parents.

The most important thing about children is the need to prepare them properly for responsible citizenship. The primary objective should not be raising a straight-A student who excels at three sports, earns a spot on the Olympic swim team, goes to an A-list university and becomes a prominent brain surgeon. The primary objective is to raise a child such that community and culture are strengthened.

“Our child is the most important person in our family” is the first step toward raising a child who feels entitled.

You don’t want that. Unbeknownst to your child, he doesn’t need that. And neither does America.

-John Rosemond

Fundraising for Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center


Hello Kibogoji Family,

Last year I opened up a one roomed after school program for kids in a small town I grew up in in Tanzania. Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center is an innovative education center that seek to bridge instructional and technology gap between rural and urban schools in Tanzania.

 

The main focus of the center is to improve early childhood access and after School enrichment programs for primary school aged students. The center opened its doors in January 2017 with 25 students in a one roomed classroom. However, due to high demand for our early childhood and after school enrichment education programs, we currently have 120 registered students. Thus, our  one roomed classroom space is very limited and we would like to expand soonest to reach more kids.

 

We currently need:

$3200 to finish constructing our new two classroom building with a teachers’ office.

$1200 to construct bathrooms. $2500 to create child friendly environment for the students including swings, slides, and a field for sports.

$650 for chairs and desks for the two classrooms. Your donation is highly appreciated and we thank you for your support.

received_699821250214119.jpeg

Please donate to support this initiative by going here: https://www.gofundme.com/kibogoji-experiential-learning-fund

 

At Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center we live our lives believing that, “it is easier to build strong children than repairing broken men.” We hope you will support us in this endevour.

Here are links to our website and Facebook pages. https://kibogoji.com/kibogoji-educational-resources/

Facebook page is found here: https://www.facebook.com/kibogojiexperientiallearningcenter/

 

Thank you so much for your support.
Shaaban Fundi, Ph.D.
#Kibogoji

 

Shaaban K Fundi, M.S., M.A., Ph.D.

Founder and Managing Director

Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center

P.O. BoX 13

Turiani, Morogoro

Tanzania

My Book: “Education System in Tanzania” will be out in February, 2020.


Kibogoji Readers,

This is to let my readers and fun know that my book entitle ”

EDUCATION IN TANZANIA

History, Policy Reforms, Education Ideologies, Evaluation and Assessment, and Research-Based Recommendations for Improving Student Achievement.

will be out this coming February, 2020. Please keep yours eyes here to be the first to hear when the book comes out. Once, the book is out all excerpts and reference on the chapters in the book will be removed from this website.

All proceeds from book sales will be used solely to expand my work in Turiani, Morogoro, Tanzania. Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center provides early childhood education and after school enrichment programs for children in Turiani, Morogoro. In addition, the center provide access to technology enhanced learning and a library where parents and kids can access books (both academic and novels).

 

 

 

Furthermore, if you would like to donate to our work, please do so by clicking here or by going to the Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center, Inc page in this website. Once there, click the donate button. YOUR DONATIONS will receive a tax exempt receit.

Thank you all,

 

The Tanzania Citizenship  Act of 1995 and Its Contradictions with Dual Citizenship for the Diaspora


Abstract

Per the Citizenship Act of 1995, persons who were citizens of either the Republic of Tanganyika or the People’s Republic of Zanzibar shall be deemed to have become citizens of the Republic of Tanzania effective from Union Day, April 26th of 1964. The 1995 Citizenship ACT does not allows dual citizenship. It does not allow women to pass their citizenship rights to their foreign born husbands and/or children from such marriages. The Act, however, sets forth requirements for citizenship and legal procedures for becoming a Tanzania citizen through naturalization. This article provide the historical anecdote that lead to Tanzania adopting a citizenship act that does not allow its citizens to carry multiple passports. It refutes the philosophical argument that dual citizenship is a threat to national security and identity. Furthermore, the article offers a counter argument for why Tanzania should provide dual citizenship for its diaspora. Such an act will benefit both the country and its citizens abroad.

Introduction

The concept of citizenship in Tanzania is rooted within the perception of national security and identity (Dahlin & Hironaka, 2008). Dahlin and Hironaka (2008, p58) argues that strict citizenship laws based on ethno-cultural boundaries and restrictive nationalist identities are good for a young developing country. The Citizenship Act of 1995 took this philosophical position allegedly in defense of and to safeguard the country’s identity and security. The idea behind this philosophical thinking is that, dual nationality tends to corrupt the cultural identity of a country and thus, making national security difficult to secure.

Ten years prior to the 1995 Citizenship Act, the country (Tanzania) took bold and forward looking steps in introducing the 1984 Constitution Amendments in which some fundamental principles of human rights and/or rights of citizens were granted. The 1984 Constitutional Amendments was arguably the most forward looking Constitutional Amendment in Tanzania’s short history, as it allowed broad human rights provisions to its citizens.  The 1995 Citizenship Act, however, was a  step backward and came with more restrictive and discriminatory clauses that exclusively prohibited dual citizenship and the rights of women married to foreigners and the rights of all Tanzania by birth citizens living abroad.

James Sapali (2015, p56) argues that the 1995 Citizenship Act was motivated by a perceived threat to national identity and security based on the political, economic, and geographical context at the time. The mid-1980s and early 1990s, were the toughest times economically for Tanzania. Because of these realities, The Citizenship Act of 1995 was made to be more exclusive and discriminatory. It purported to protect the county’s perceived national identity and security threats presented by the changes in the demographics, political, and economical situations. Arguably, the Citizenship Act of 1995 was made purposely to target and exclude some individuals and particularly Asian-Tanzanians who were perceived as outsiders and/or foreigners who posed threat to the country’s economy, and thus, its identity and national security. In addition, the Act was made to be very discriminatory against women. In the 1995 Citizenship ACT women are not allowed to pass their citizenship rights to husbands of foreign origin and children born to those marriages. This was made explicitly so that to discourage people (male) from foreign country to marry Tanzanians and thus, acquiring citizenship rights through marriage. On the contrary, this patriarchal and male dominated Citizenship Act, allowed for male citizenship’s rights to be passed on to their foreign-born wives and their children.  In addition, the 1995 ACT strongly prohibits dual citizenship for a mere reason based on a perceived lack of loyalty from those gaining citizenships in foreign countries. No real or perceived threats have demonstrably been found to support this philosophical position.

Flaws in the National Security and Identity Argument

The premise that Tanzanians who acquire citizenships in other countries are threats to national security and national identity is flawed. First, most Tanzanian citizens and Tanzanian by birth have a stake in the development of Tanzania. This is evident by the tireless work they do to attract investment to Tanzania, to invest in Tanzania, and through many collaborative work and programs they engage in to develop the wellbeing of Tanzania and their fellow-citizens. Secondly, majority of Tanzanians and Tanzanian by birth who resides in foreign countries send huge amount of remittances each year back into the country. It is estimated that in the year 2015 alone, Tanzanians in the diaspora sent a total $750 millions to Tanzania (World Bank, 2015). This amount is larger than the amount of foreign currency the country received from its sales of cotton, coffee, tea, flowers, cloves, and sisal combined, in the same year (Zitto, Kabwe, Personal Communication). Yet, the $750 million remittance amount stated in the World Bank report is the lower threshold of the total remittance the country receives. Other, sources believe, Tanzania received an upward of $850 million in 2015 through remittances sent via Hawala. The $850 million figure is larger than what the country receives from the Millennium Corporate Challenge (MCC Funds). In 2013 MCC provided Tanzania with $698.1 million (Millennium Corporate Challenge, 2013). The discrepancy in remittance reporting is because the country lack a reliable method of tracking remittance entering the country from its diaspora.

These examples demonstrate the flaws in the thinking that provided the framework for the 1995 Citizenship Act. The thought that national security and identity cannot be properly secured, if, and when, a citizen of Tanzania acquires citizenship in a foreign land is not supported by facts. In addition, stripping women’s citizenship rights based on who they happen to marry is in violation of equal treatment rights. Foreign husbands and their children should be afforded the same rights as their male counterparts.

Furthermore, there are six countries in the East African Community. Three of the six countries in the East African Community allow dual citizenships for their citizens. Apparently, there has never been a national security threat nor national identity erosion in these three member states since they allowed dual citizenship. The claim that dual citizenship is a threat to national security and national identity is baseless and is an argument devoid of factual evidence. Currently, there are 71 countries worldwide that allows dual citizenship in some shape or form. The benefits of Dual Citizenship are self evident in countries such as Israel, Nigeria, India, Brazil, and China.

Nine Reasons for Dual Citizenship in Tanzania

Most of us advocate for dual citizenship because of our love for Tanzania, albeit poor and struggling. Most of us a driven by our patriotic duty to our country of origin. For the same reason, we write commentaries, participate in social media forums and other channels. We love Tanzania and want to see the nation progress from poverty to prosperity.

The adoption of the New Constitution may be justified for the following reasons:

First, dual citizens can receive the benefits and privileges offered by each country. For example, they have access to two social service systems, can vote in either country and may be able to run for office in either country (depending on each country’s laws). They are also allowed to work in either country without needing a work permit or visa and can attend school in either country at the citizen tuition rate (Jean Folger).

Why is this important to a Developing World countries like Tanzania?

Tanzania is still grappling with an undeveloped education system. For the most part its teachers are inadequately trained, the facilities are either dilapidated or not there, and generally, educational standards are below the standards of those of the developed nations, like Canada or the USA. It is not being at variance to argue that leaders trained and who actually lived in the developed educational background will have more to give in terms of leadership, value and ideas. They may also be able to live out what has worked abroad. Because they have the experience of living successfully in those nations.

Second, being trained abroad and living abroad are not the same things, therefore, only those who live abroad will have a sustained impact on the politics and economics of the poor nations. Take as an example a person who spends five years in college or university abroad. This person will perhaps be on a VISA or some sort of Study Permit has limited access to resources and in most cases, will have limited mobility. When this person returns home, other than what they learned through “osmosis,” they have nothing more than classroom experience of the developed countries thought. In short, though trained abroad, these “Western educated Africans” will still be African-minded in terms of policing and programming. It is not that African education is not adequate to develop Africa; it is a truism that most of what is in Africa is either imported from the developed countries or has their blessings. Talk of books, technology, leadership paradigms, even the sources of money used in Africa, these for the most part, come or have been borrowed from the rich countries. In recent past, Tanzanian politicians have gone and died abroad. It cannot be because Tanzania has no medical facilities; it is because Tanzanians know, implicitly or explicitly, that better medical facilities are still found abroad.

Third, and as an addendum to three above, “Foreign-educated leaders attract more FDI to their country. Our rationale is that education obtained abroad encompasses a whole slew of factors that can make a difference in FDI flows when this foreign-educated individual becomes a leader” (Constant and Tien, 2010). FDI or foreign direct investment is a much needed currency in Tanzania’s quest to wean itself from the aura of central government. However, and even more importantly, foreign companies and governments may trust those who got their education and business experience from abroad and even more those who lived and worked abroad. If a president is one who lived and worked abroad, you can imagine the level of trust in his/her government. It is also important to emphasize that citizens who have lived abroad may, comparatively, be less corrupt, less dictatorial, less autocratic, less dishonest, and more democratic and fair in their approach to governance. The reason is simple, because they lived and absorbed those values which most developed countries subscribe to.

Fourth, the idea of “Brain Earn” comes to light. Remember in the late 1980s and early 1990s when the concept of “brain drain” was rife on the political tongue! Now, the idea of brain drain is becoming obsolete and more so with increased global economic integration in place. Relocation or immigration does not drain brains anymore, it empowers brains. In other words, training or living in another country shapes your brain to infinite possibilities in terms of economic modelling, political idealization or social industry. A leader who has spent ten years squarely in Africa will be less industrious, less innovative, and less dexterous than another who lived or worked abroad, especially in the developed country! This is the same reason why developed governments appoint leaders who have lived in Africa to head undertakings whose mission involve Africa.

fifth, a dual citizen can own property in either country. This benefits both countries, but especially the poor country. The reason is simple, some countries restrict land ownership to citizens only and land or property is a genuine investment. Imagine more Tanzanians owning property, land and businesses abroad! Imagine what this will do to promoting the Tanzanian brands, connecting local businesses to the developed ones and generally putting Tanzania on the map as has been the case for Israel, Nigeria or India! And this is not new, major corporations from the developed countries do own lands and properties and businesses in Africa. They can relocate interests based on the viability of the enterprise or enabling economic environment in either country. This benefit is self-assertive.

Sixth, dual citizenship informs cultural education. “Having dual citizenship gives you the chance to educate others about the culture and people of two different countries. Governments may like dual citizenship because it helps to promote a country’s image and culture abroad. If you have two passports, you may have more access to the world” (Kate Bradley). Even more, it enhances tourism and promotes a healthy image abroad. Consider the Jews and the impact they have had in the USA, Canada, and UK! Consider the Nigerians, Jamaicans and to some extent, Indians! All these nationals have made their birth countries powerful abroad. In international parlance, that means economic boom and political propagation of their originating countries.

Seventh, dual citizenship entails easy of travel. If you are a dual citizen, you enjoy the protection of two governments even when you are traveling. If you encounter problems on the trip, you can appeal to one or both governments’ embassies. “When asked for identification during international travels, you can supply the passport that is least likely to raise eyebrows or cause problems among officials. You can also travel to both countries as a native citizen, avoiding the lengthy airport queues and questioning about your purposes” (Kate Bradley). This is self-explanatory.

Eighth, dual citizenship promotes increased security awareness. To a dual citizen, one country may be a homeland but the other is very much a new home. Immediately this will cause them to fully experience and embrace the ideals of both countries. Dual citizens will more likely than mono-citizens promote peace and order in both countries because of dual security interests in both. They will also be more sensitive to issues of war, terrorism and treason. This is the very opposite of the fears most people have of dual citizenship. Dual citizens, by design, are incapable of compromising the security secrets of both countries. They will likely defend both interests with equal strength. Their own safety depends on it.

Ninth, one question that cannot be avoided now is: Where is the world going? The world is trekking towards more integration, globalization, and outsourcing of important jobs and ideas. Rather than being individuals, nationals are tending to be more world citizens. The Internet is drawing all of us together; Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, and various social media are drawing us towards one identity. Although no nation should sacrifice its sovereignty for integration, it is vital to understanding that socio-political dynamics are calling on us to unite more, cooperate more and share more equitably the world’s diminishing and scarce resources. In light of this, duality of citizenship will not be much to ask for. The only caveat under this clarion is that no-one nation should take advantage of another in economic and security terms. Done properly and lawfully, both countries stand to benefit from dual citizenship.

Conclusion

For Tanzania, the move to dual-nationality is a move in the right direction. President John Pombe Magufuli would be doing the best investment of his presidency for spearheading the process to  adopt the New Constitutional. The Tanzanian parliamentarians need to push for a revival of the New Constitution Bill. The issue of dual citizenship is not for the benefit of the Tanzania diaspora alone, it is for the benefit of the country. It is not Canada or the USA or wherever countries Tanzanian citizens resides which stands to benefit, it is Tanzania. Tanzania will not make economic, political or social progress unless one of its sons or daughters who has been educated, worked and lived abroad (especially in a developed country) is allowed to participate uninfringed politically, economically, and socially in the development of Tanzania.

               References.

 

Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center: Update!


Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center is housed in a one and a half roomed house near the police post in Turiani, Morogoro. Currently the center has over 800 different types of books icluding children’s books, adult books, and youth books. The books are mostly in English. In addition to English book, Kibogoji was able to secure over 50 books from the Tanzania Publishing House (TPB). These additional books are mainly in Kiswahili and a few of them are bilingual (Swahili and English).

Kibogoji understand that childrens in our village are academically struggling especially in Math, English, and Swahili. Thus, the center’s short-term goal is to improve reading, writing, and arithmetic skills for children in our neighborhood. In addition, the center emphasize the use of technology in learning. Currently, Kibogoji has 10 laptops and one desktop computer for technology infused learning. Kibogoji also believes that books are a window to the unknown world. Thus, reading different books and especially books from other cultures will not only expose our children to the world far from theirs, but, also will improve their literacy and arithmetic comprehension skills.

Thus, a book reading, writing, and math after school refresher program is currently being implemented at the center. This intensive reading, writing, and arithmetic program started January, 2017. Through this program we will be able to close the gap in math, reading, and writing in our rural community.

Kibogoji uses both formative and summative assessment tools to measure the effectiveness of our after school program. In particular, pre-and post-test assessment tools are used to measure growth and goal attainment. The assessment tools designed to assess the effectiveness of this program are rigorous, scientifically designed, research based, and evidence based. In addition, assessment during learning, rapid response systems, and ongoing re-teaching strategies are all being used throughout the six months period to make sure all children are learning at the highest levels.

As we embark on this journey to help all kids have access to quality education. Kibogoji hopes, all well-wishers will support our efforts. We believe in the “It takes a Village to Raise a Child Concept.” With this in mind, we are looking forward to 2017 to be a great year in ensuring access to quality education for all children. Be part of our effort by contributing here: donate.

Furthermore, at Kibogoji  Experiential Learning Center, we believe that “Building Stronger Children is Easier than Repairing Brocken Men.” Therefore, to create a just society we must build stronger children and equip them with sellable skills. As we are settling in in the 21st century, skills that would be highly needed in any profession includes: great presentation skills, writing skills, math skills, and information technology skills. Thus, these are the core competences we are intending to build for the children of Turiani at the Kibogoji Center. To read more about our initive click this link here: kibogojibrochure-doc

Kibogoji7

What’s New at Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center?


Good Morning Kibogoji Readers,

I have been working tirelessly for the past 3 years to open up a small experiential learning and media center for children of Turiani, Morogoro, in Tanzania. I am proud to announce that the wait is finally over. The Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center, inc is now open and the demand for what we offer is off the roof.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center, Inc is the only door to the world unknown for majority of the children attending it. I’m delighted and very excited for the children. I wish all of them, a great year ahead. I am sure the children of Kibogoji will have a great year full of learning, playing, watching videos, and just having fun.

The centers’ goals for the first operating year are:

1) to improve reading and writing skills for the first and second grade students through an intensive reading and writing program.

2) to improve arithmetic skills for the first and second grade students through a rigorous math program.

3) to infuse the use of technology and play into teaching and learning.

4) to introduce an experiential learning program that will pair up children with professionals in our community so that the kids can learn different life and professional skills from adults.

As you can imagine, this is such a special year for Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center, Inc because the center has recently received five laptops and one brand new desktop computer. In addition, Kibogoji has also received a brand new projector and a sorround sound system. This is just the beginning of a great year ahead. It’s my hope, and without a doubt, that the best is yet to come.

If you would like to help the center become the change you would like to see and/or associate with, please visit: here for donations and to learn more about what we do. You can also e mail the program director Dr. Shaaban Fundi directly through this e mail: skfundi@hotmail.com.

As is, the space in which the center is housed is very small. Currently we can only accommodate about 15 kids at a time. The center is open for three hours a day and takes in two classes of 15 kids each one hour and a half. I would love to open up more space to accommodate more children. Right now the center accommodates 30 kids a day and about 150 children a week. I would love to buy more land so the kids have space for sports as well.

My observations for the first month of operation are that, due to limited space, we are not reaching a greater number of children in our community. Since the center was opened we have been turning kids away because of lack of space. If you feel like what we are doing at Kibogoji center is in line with the things you would like to help, please do so by donating your time and/or money to help us reach all children with our services.

Lastly, Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center has hired two highly qualified teachers to run the center. The teachers will be responsible for the day to day operation of the center’s work and creating lesson plans and all other activities geared towards achieving the center’s goals.

Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center: Progress Report.


Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center is housed in a one and ahalf roomed house near the police post in Turiani, Morogoro. Currently the center has over 800 different books. The books are mostly in English. In addition to the English book, Kibogoji was able to secure over 100 books from the Tanzania Publishing House (TPB) that are mainly in Kiswahili and a few of these books are bilingual (Swahili and English).

At Kibogoji, we understand that kids in our village are academically struggling especially in Math, English, and Swahili. Thus, the center’s short-term goal is to improve reading, writing, and arithmetic skills for children in our neighborhood. Kibogoji also believes that books are windows to the world unseen. Thus, reading books will expose our children to the world far from theirs.

A book reading, writing, and math refresher programs will be implemented. This intensive reading, writing, and arithmetic program will start this coming January, 2017. Through this program we will be able to close the math, reading, and writing gap for our children.

We will measure the impact of our intensive program using both formative and summative assessments. In particular,  a pre-and post-test assessment tool will be used to measure growth. The assessment tools we will be using in this program are rigorous, scientifically designed, research based, and evidence based . In addition, assessment during learning, rapid response systems, and on going reteaching strategies will be used throughout the six months to make sure all children  are learning at highest standards.

As we embark on this journey to help all kids have access to quality education. We hope, all well wishers will support this effort. We are looking forward to 2017 to be a great year in ensuring access to quality education for all our children.

As an educator, I believe “Building Stronger Children is Easier Than Repairing Brocken Men.” Therefore, to create a just society we must build stronger children and equip them with sellable skills. At the time when we are settling in in the 21st century, the skills that would be highly needed include: Great presentation skills, Writing skills, Math skills, and Information Technology Skills. Thus, these are the core competences we are intending to build for the children of Turiani at the Kibogoji Center.

Happy Holidays!!

To help Kibogoji Experiential Learning Center, Inc continue this wonderful work, donate here.  Your contributions are tax deductible. Thank you!!

Laura Pili Fundi: Little House on the Prairie.


Little house on the Prairie

By:

Laura Pili Fundi

   The tittle of my book is Little House on the Prairie. The author of this book is Laura Ingalls Wilder. The main characters of this book are: Laura, Mary, Ma, Pa, Baby Carrie, and Jack, their dog. The main characters in this story are related because they are in the same family.  The story takes place on the prairie near the creek, in Kansas. I know they are in the prairie in Kansas because at the beginning of this book the narrator describes being in the big woods of Wisconsin before moving to Kansas to the prairie.

This book begins when they are in the Big Woods of Wisconsin. The Big woods of Wisconsin was good while they Ingalls family was growing up. However, many people started moving over to Wisconsin because of immigration. The Ingalls family did not enjoy having all the people living around them. They decided to move west. Their journey was a success. There were no injuries and everyone was safe the whole way. But there were many difficulties during their journey such as crossing the river. Crossing a big river back in the 1800’s would normally take a week or 5 days.

The person telling the story is no one in the book in fact, it is the narrator. The main character of this book is Laura Ingalls. Laura is a very cheerful person, respectful, and is very brave. She was being brave when Ma and Baby Carrie were in the house with the Indians. She ran towards the house to see what was going on while being respectful towards her dad by not letting jack off his leash to go attack the Indians. I think the author wants us (the person reading the story) to think Laura is a very respectful child. I know this because whenever her parents tell her to do something she does it and does not hesitate or argue. I really like Laura because she is cheerful, respectful, and brave which is very good of a personality.

When there was a fire, Laura, Mary, Ma, and Pa did the right thing. They all worked together to keep each other safe. Laura helped pa get all the buckets filled up with water. Pa and Ma poured the buckets of water on to the fire. While Laura, Baby Carrie, And Jack waited by the house to stay safe. Now I know what to do on a real emergency with a fire.

This book connected me with the world of the 1800’s. Because in the 1800’s many things were the same like in the book: Little House on the Prairie. Like when they crossed the river in the 1800’s, I took about as long as I takes to across the country today by a car. This also reminds me of the 1800’s because in the beginning of the book, the narrator explained that people back then went in wagons to get to places. Also when they were on the prairie, Indians roamed around. Moreover, wild fires were a daily existence and you had to put them out yourself. It also reminds me of the 1800’s because getting food you had to hunt and you had to make a well to fetch your own water from.

Difficult, but, fun life­­—–it was.

Changing Realities of Relationship Structure and Marriage in the Modern World.


The world is rapidly changing. Men needs to change too. They need to change their customs and thoughts process to accommodate the changing realities and circumstances for and of women. Currently, it is a normal occurrence in both the developing and the developed world to see women increasingly becoming financially independent than men.

This is something that men may be afraid of. Unfortunately, there is nothing men can do to stop this trend. The train has already left the station so to speak.

Men can’t stop these new realities. Therefore, they must adapt by changing their customs and thought process regarding relationship structures and marriage. Men must confront their pre-existing notion about a position they must occupy  in relationship with women in an increasingly becoming women dominated world.

I know it is tough for men to do so. History has been on the side of men for centuries. The books ( both holy and non-holy) that men wrote to keep women in subjugated positions are starting to lose meaning. Most men are scared of the new world they are about to venture.

Perhaps, at this juncture, I suggest men should celebrate women’s new found ranks in our societies and embrace the changing economic and relationship landscape. Because to keep resisting what we know we cannot stop is living lie.
The fact that they are more girls than boys in most colleges (Rocheleau, M. (2006), Pew Research Center, (2014) and National Center for Education Statistics, (2012)  is a tale tell sign of what is yet to come.

Simply put, women will be spearheading most economic and job ranks in the near future. It’s just a fact. It may sound scary for some, but, facts must remain so.

In most society and especially here in the West, women are enjoying this new found space in their lives. And, men must start realizing that their hegemonic stronghold towards a relationship with women needs to change.

As I write this, there are a number of unmarried women in Tanzania and in the USA , for the simple reason that men are either afraid of them because of their financial freedom and/or job titles they hold. Men needs to come to term with the current economic and women empowerment realities. Otherwise, many fine women will be left out to live their lives in sex-less, relationship-less, and child-less environment. Just because they were able to gain financial freedom or higher job statuses than men. That to me is shameful. I believe strongly in the idea that men don’t have to subjugate women to be complete. I know this concept is hard to digest in a testosterone (male) dominated society.

Furthermore, the research in future marriages and income suggests that our daughters will more likely become financially independent more so than the men who will marry them. My question is: should the men who are not independently worth run away from our daughters?

I think not.

Thus, there is a need to define success, relationship structures, and marriage differently so that these societal values go along with the changing world. Again, I am not advocating for men to depend on their women. What I am saying here is this— in order for families to have a balanced family life that imparts value to children (the rounded child concept), sometimes it is necessary to have one of the parents take a more direct role in the children’s ‘ upbringing. This may lead to one of the partners losing ground in the financial aspect of the relationship. It can be the father or the mother.

Which one?  It doesn’t matter. Does it?

There is a lot of negative impacts (socially, economically, and behaviorally) associated with kids’ upbringing when both parents decide to climb the corporate ladder. The research on children development is very clear on this. Most families are starting to realize the consequences of letting kids either raise themselves or being raised by a house girl or boy. When parents take on time consuming and stressful jobs to be financially independent, brought by insecurities in their relationships, the kids suffer as a result. Thus, we must ask ourselves: what is good for us as parents and also what is generally good for our children? Whatever the answer is—that is what we must do.

Fully Funded Scholarships For Tanzanians


2016 Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD study in the UK (Fully Funded) Application Deadline: 19November 2016
http://www.opportunitiesforcafricans.com/2016-commonwealth-scholarships-for-masters-and-phd-study-in-the-uk-fully-funded/

Please apply… & don’t forget to share the opportunity

1. Australia Award Scholarship (http://australiaawardsindo.or.id)
2. LPDP Scholarsh hip (http://www.beasiswalpdp.org/index.html)
3. DIKTI Scholarship a. Dalam Negeri (http://www.beasiswa.dikti.go.id/dn/)b. Luar Negeri (http://beasiswa.dikti.go.id/ln/)
4. Turkey Government Scholarship (http://www.turkiyeburslari.gov.tr/index.php/en)
5. General Cultural Scholarship India (http://www.iccrindia.net/gereralscheme.html)
6. USA Government Scholarship a. (http://www.aminef.or.id/index.php)b. (http://www.iief.or.id)
7. Netherland Government Scholarship (http://www.nesoindonesia.or.id/beasiswa)
8. Korean Government Scholarship (http://www.niied.go.kr/eng/contents.do…)
9. Belgium Government Scholarship (http://www.vliruos.be/4273.aspx)
10. Israel … … xxx
11. Sciences Po France (http://formation.sciences-po.fr/…/the-emile-boutmy-scholars…)
12. Utrecht University Netherland (http://www.uu.nl/…/grantsandscholarships/Pages/utrechtexcel…)
13. Prasetya Mulya Business School Indonesia (http://www.pmbs.ac.id/s2/scholarship.php?lang=ENG)
14. Brunei Darussalam Government Scholarship (http://www.mofat.gov.bn/index.php/announcement)
15. Monbugakusho Scholarship Japan (http://www.id.emb-japan.go.jp/sch.html)
16. Paramadina University Master Fellowship Indonesia (https://gradschool.paramadina.ac.id/…/paramadina-medco-fell…)
17. PPM School of Management Indonesia (http://ppm-manajemen.ac.id/beasiswa-penuh-s2-mm-reguler/)
18. University of Twente Netherland (http://www.utwente.nl/internationa…/scholarshipsandgrants/…/)
19. Sweden Government Scholarship (http://www.studyinsweden.se/Scholarships/)
20. Chinese Government Scholarship (http://www.csc.edu.cn/laihua/scholarshipdetailen.aspx…)
21. Taiwan Government Scholarship (http://www.studyintaiwan.org/taiwan_scholarships.html)
22. United Kingdom Government SCholarship (http://www.chevening.org/indonesia/)
23. Panasonic Scholarship Japan (http://panasonic.net/citizensh…/scholarships/…/requirements/)
24. Ancora Foundation Scholarship (http://ancorafoundation.com)
25. Asian Public Intellectuals Fellowship Japan (http://www.api-fellowships.org/body/)
26. AUN/SEED-Net Scholarship (http://www.seed-net.org/index.php)
27. Art Asia Major Scholarship Korea National University of Arts (http://eng.karts.ac.kr:81/karts/board/list.jsp…)
28. Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University Japan (http://www.apu.ac.jp/home/life/index.php?content_id=30)
29. Seoul National University Korea (http://en.snu.ac.kr/…/gradu…/scholarships/before-application)
30. DIKTIS Overseas Scholarship (http://www.pendis.kemenag.go.id/beasiswaln/)
31. Honjo International Scholarship Foundation Japan (http://hisf.or.jp/english/sch-f/)
32. IDB Merit Scholarship Programme for High Techn… read more

Life time: a concept I learned volunteering at a senior citizen’s living community.


There are 24 life hours in a day. You sleep for 8 of them (recommended). That leaves you with 16 hours. Lets say you spend 4 hours for your commute, shower, eating, and other none important issues of the day. Now you are left with 12 life hours.

These are your life hours for a day. Twelve hours only. You have a choice. You can either sell most of those hours to the highest bidder ( climbing the corporate ladder for what is called success) or enjoy them yourself (with your kids, your family, and also for traveling)while selling just a few to your work.

I learned this important life lesson while volunteering at a senior citizen’s retirement home. That life comes with a fixed amount of time. And that life is about experience over things…….things that you sell your life time for. Things like titles and material wealth. Both comes at a cost called your life time. You have to sell your life time to achieve them.

To live a full life, you have to realign your value system.

I am not anti success or anything. However, balancing your life time is important. Don’t sell all of your life time to the highest salary or to accumulating only material wealth. When the time comes for your life’s curtains to close on you. Something called regret, oftentimes shows up.

And I know so much about life’s regret through my experience volunteering at the senior home. Most of the elderly I met regretted not spending their life time with their kids, family, and also not spending their life time traveling. No one regretted not having money. Because money did not have value or meaning to them when the only thing they were waiting for was death. Life time had value, unfortunately, there was not much of it left for them.

So, while you have plenty of your life time, spending it with your kids, family, and do travel to have the experiences that you will cherish while waiting for the time for you to leave this earth.

Please spend your life time wisely.

Dr. Shaaban K Fundi

CHAPTER THREE: Education Ideologies


CHAPTER THREE: Education Ideologies

You may be asking yourself, why am I talking about education ideologies while discussing the education system in Tanzania? The answer is simple. Human knowledge is socially constructed. In order to create solutions related to education, the context under which those solutions are created is important. In addition, to create solutions to educational problems, one needs to know Continue reading “CHAPTER THREE: Education Ideologies”

Chapter Two: Major Policy Reforms Continued


As I continue to write about education reforms in Tanzania. Chapter 2 will not be complete without a mention of a monumental and most progressive education policy released in February of 2015. Here, instead of writing descriptively about the policy itself and what it contains, I will highlight the issues I thought were great. In addition, I will also talk briefly about the areas that were raised but there is lack of detailed information about them Continue reading “Chapter Two: Major Policy Reforms Continued”

CHAPTER TWO: Major Education Reform


Chapter two covers the major policy changes that took place in the education system in Tanzania since the country’s Independence. I don’t claim the list to be complete or exhaustive, however, it is a good start to understanding the changes that took place within the education system because of internal and external political realities of the times Continue reading “CHAPTER TWO: Major Education Reform”

CHAPTER ONE: Background of Education in Tanzania


The Tanzanian education system would not have existed without a mention of both colonial Germanic and British education systems.  Prior to the German and British education systems, it is documented that formal Western schooling began in around 1868 by missionaries of different denominations. Before the missionaries, an informal tribal education existed in each of the more than 120 tribes in the country. Continue reading “CHAPTER ONE: Background of Education in Tanzania”

AN OVERVIEW OF THE EDUCATION SYSTEM IN TANZANIA: History, Reforms, and Research-Based Recommendations for Improvement.


This small handbook covers the history of the education system in Tanzania, the major policy reforms that have taken place since the country’s independence, and at the end, the handbook offers research-based recommendations that the country can pursue to change its education system to meet the needs of all children. As you may know, there have been numerous discussions regarding the successes and failures of the education system in Tanzania. Continue reading “AN OVERVIEW OF THE EDUCATION SYSTEM IN TANZANIA: History, Reforms, and Research-Based Recommendations for Improvement.”

Improving equity and quality of education in Tanzania


In this presentation I discuss educational philosophies the Tanzanian education system has pursued since the country’s independence. Tanzania inherited the British System of Education. In its early years, the country pursued the Excellence Model of Education. The Excellence Model of education was entirely based on a bizarre interpretation of Darwin’s Theory of Evolution. Early educationists believed in the survival of the fittest as being the main tenet of the Darwinian Theory. Thus, survival of the fittest become the heart and soul of their education philosophy. The country pursued this philosophy (educating only the best) of education until late 1990s. Continue reading “Improving equity and quality of education in Tanzania”

Socially Balanced Equity Education


Growing up I always thought I needed to work at a lucrative job and make tones of money so that I can escape poverty. As a kid, I thought being rich was the best thing ever. Growing up in a poverty stricken neighborhood, I have seen and experienced the real problems associated with poverty. And, I tell you, poverty isn’t fun. Continue reading “Socially Balanced Equity Education”

What ails the Tanzanian Education System? The GPA vs Division Debate.


Yesterday, I re-read a letter  Mr. Rakesh Rajani  wrote to Prime Minister Mizengo Pinda. The letter was titled “Commission to Investigate Causes of Poor Form IV Results” and dated May 13th, 2013.   The letter sparked my interest on recent development regarding education reporting in Tanzania. A few weeks ago, Professor Ndalichako decided to remove the use of gpa in calculating students’ results when reporting exam scores. In arriving to her decision, Professor Ndalichako (the current Minister of Education) reported to have used sound scientific evidence. I quote “”Yes, we need change, but change should be informed and backed by scientific grounds.” Continue reading “What ails the Tanzanian Education System? The GPA vs Division Debate.”

The VARK Learning Theory


VARK is an acronym that stands for visual, audial/aural, read/write, and kinesthetic (Fleming & Mills, 1992; Fleming & Baume (2007). The VARK Learning Style Inventory categorizes students’ into one of these four categories based on how they prefer to receive and deliver information (Lang, 2004). Students who are capable of using more than one learning style equally well are categorized as multi-modal learners (Fleming & Mills, 1992). The VARK Learning Style Questionnaire consists of 16 questions and the highest score received in each category determines a student’s learning style. Continue reading “The VARK Learning Theory”

Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory


Kolb’s Learning Style Theory is based on Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory. Experiential learning theory is influenced by the work of 20th century educational theorists such as John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, Jean Piaget, Wiliam James, Carl Jung, Paulo Freire, Carl Rogers and many others who in one way or the other gave experience a central role in their theories regarding human development (Kolb, 1981, Kolb, 1984, Kolb & Kolb, 2005). Continue reading “Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory”

A Survey of the Literature on Factors affecting learning Style preferences of the Learner


Previous studies have indicated that gender, age, and cultural heritage affects the learners’ learning style (Charlesworth, 2008; De Vita, 2010, Joy & Dunn, 2008; Song & Oh, 2011). Studies have also documented that learning styles are affected by other factors Griggs and Dunn (1998). Thus, factors such as these needs to be considered when identifying learning style preferences of the student as they may influence learning outcomes. Continue reading “A Survey of the Literature on Factors affecting learning Style preferences of the Learner”

A Case Study: A Juvenile offender’s Account of His Experiences at Home, the Streets, and at a Metro Atlanta High School in Georgia.


In 2011, there were 34946 juvenile offenders in the state of Georgia (Department of Juvenile Justice, 2013). Of the 34946 offenders, 24319 were males and 10627 were females. The racial distribution of juvenile offenders in the state of Georgia in 2013 was 13434 whites, 18788 blacks, 1983 Hispanics, and 741 other races (Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice, 2013). According to Simones and Stones (2012) the state of Georgia classifies juvenile offenses into two main categories: status offenders and juvenile delinquency (Simones & Stones, 2012). By definition, the term status offender refer Continue reading “A Case Study: A Juvenile offender’s Account of His Experiences at Home, the Streets, and at a Metro Atlanta High School in Georgia.”

Diversity Issues in American Schools: An Overview


America has been a diverse country since its inception (Banks & Banks, 2001). Many groups of people have migrated to the U.S in search of religious freedom, economic opportunity, and a better life for themselves and their children (Millet, 2000). Thus, America is often referred to as a country of immigrants. In the beginning, Continue reading “Diversity Issues in American Schools: An Overview”

Do Leader Keys Address Cultural Competency?


In order to find information to answer the question of whether or not leader keys training address cultural competency, I interviewed an assistant principal at a school. Before the interview, I decided to familiarize myself with the definition of cultural competency. Cultural competency refers to an ability Continue reading “Do Leader Keys Address Cultural Competency?”

Micro Leadership Issues: K-12 Americana


In the past three weeks, we have been discussing six K-12 major educational issues related to instructional leadership at the micro level. The issues we discussed were: Principal and Teacher Opinions of walkthroughs, Teacher Professional Development, Administrators Training for TKES/LKES for walkthroughs, The Process of Recruiting Principals, The Number of Males vs Female Principals, and Teachers Opinions Continue reading “Micro Leadership Issues: K-12 Americana”